Cambridge cycle point maintenance programme underway

Thursday, 20 August 2020

Greater Anglia is asking cyclists in Cambridge to remove unwanted or unused bikes from the city’s cycle point, to help free up space for others.

Abandoned and unused bikes will be removed from the city’s largest parking facility to free up space.

Greater Anglia plans to spruce up the three-storey cycle park, and free up more space for cycles, which is located next to Cambridge railway station.

Work has now started to attach tags to cycles. Cyclists should remove the tag from the bike to indicate it is being used.

Any cycles with tags left on them after 19 September will be removed from the cycle point and donated to charity.

Over the past two years, hundreds of cycles have been donated to the Colchester-based charity Re-Cycle, which restores bikes and donates them to communities in Africa.

Mark Ellis, Greater Anglia’s Head of Facilities Management, said: "We know some bikes have been abandoned at Cambridge cycle point and we are working with our contractor Carlisle to clear these and free up space for those who wish to use it.

"Many cycles have been abandoned in the cycle point and we will remove these first. We will then ask people to indicate that they are still using their cycles and then we will clean the entire building.

"Although regular litter picks happen every morning, we want to do our best to keep the cycle point looking as clean and tidy as possible.

"Cycle point remains a safe, free, space for people to park their bikes and we are committed to keeping it in good condition for the cyclists who use it every day."

The cycle park, which opened in February 2016, cost £2.5m and has 2850 cycle spaces. It’s the biggest facility of its kind in the country and is free of charge

The cycle park has CCTV and lighting throughout and is security patrolled by staff every four hours. Security is also being stepped up, with Land Sheriffs patrolling the facility.

The cycle tagging event happens regularly at Cambridge cycle point. Last year more than 200 cycles, wheels and frames were removed.